Johnson Family Tree







Click here to get your own free online family tree
Powered by FamilyTreeGuide.com



Home


Log In


Register for a User Account


Advanced Search


Surnames


Photos


Histories & Documents


Cemeteries & Headstones


Reports


Sources


What's New


Statistics


Administration




Login

Search

Administration

LiveZilla Live Help

"Taltsuska" "Chuqualatague" Doublehead[1]

Home  Search  Individual  Pedigree  Descendancy  Relationship  Timeline  Login
Birth  Abt 1730  Stearns, Sand Cliffs, Mccreary Co., Kentucky 
Sex  Male 
Died  9 Aug 1807  Macintosh Tavern, Hiwassee River, Tennessee 
Buried  Unknown  Doublehead Gap, Wayne Co. Kentucky 
Person ID  I11528  Default Tree 
Last Modified  18 Nov 2003 
 
Father  George Watts, - Onitostah, Onitostaii, Utisdasata, Rayetaeh-Utis, b. Abt 1680 
Mother  Eughioote Tassel 
Group Sheet  F6378  Default Tree 
 
Notes 
  • Appears usually as "Doublehead" on all lists to 11/97. Doublehead's "home" appears to have been in and around Stearns, KY. He was associated with a place called "Sand Cliffs" which is "nearby to Stearns". Doublehead Cave is also reportedly
    near Stearns. Doublehead Gap is within an hours drive, or less, of Stearns

    The white men of the area called him Chief Doublehead. Tal-tsu'ska means "Two-heads". He was also known as Chuqualatague and Dsu-gwe-la-de-gi.

    One theory says that he was killed by John Rogers/Rodgers, great grandfather of Will Rogers/Rodgers, for selling land to the white man.

    I think Chuqualataque means Red Paint Claw of the Cherokees.

    He was either born in Pulaski Co.,KY near Somerset. In the vicinity of the Cumberland River in Indian Nation or in Dunk Town,TN

    Info from various internet sources. 1 in paticular, with much info on descendents is http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/i/cJames-R-Hicks/BOOK-0001/00 25-001.html. He uses much documentation from many books,ie,"Cherokee Tragedy";"Old Frontiers" by John P. Brown;"Indian Countryman" of Hiawassee; the Emmet Starr book on the Cherokee;and Don Chestnut's website-www.users.mis.net/ ~chestnut/pages/cherokee.htm

    Chief Chugqualatague, or Doublehead, was the last Cherokee Chief to exercise control over the upper Cumberland plateau and was a lieutenant of Dragging Canoe. He was born near the present town of Somerset, KY, and had two known children by his wife who was reported to be of French-Indian extraction. These children were Cornblossom and Tuckaho.

    Chief Doublehead was a brother of Chief Old Tassel, as well as Pumpkin Boy. After the signing of the Treaty of Hopewell in 1785, delegates from Congress were trying to keep the peace between the Cherokees and squatters on their lands. In June 1788, Old Tassel was killed by a renegade settler by the name of Kirk while under a flag of truce and war became unavoidable. Old Tassel's death united the Cherokees under Little Turkey, including the Chickamaugas under Dragging Canoe, who split from the other Cherokee tribes some time earlier. In May 1792, John Watts succeeded Dragging Canoe as War Chief with Doublehead as his second in command. In Sep 1893, Watts and Doublehead led a campaign against the white settlers.
    A great atrocity was perpetrated on this campaign. Doublehead, his brother Pumpkin Boy, and their nephew Bench (Bob Benge) ambushed Capt. Overall, a known Indian fighter, and a companion named Burnett near Dripping Spring in KY. After they killed and scalped the two men, the Indians drank their whiskey, cut strips off the dead men, then roasted and devoured their flesh. At some time, Pumpkin Boy was killed on this campaign. John Sevier launched a campaign against the Cherokee towns and after a battle at Etowah, forced the Cherokees to sue for peace. Although another Treaty was signed in 1794, Brigadier General James Robertson had to tell Major James Ore to lead another campaign against the Chickamaugas before peace was restored.
    In 1796, Chief Doublehead had become the Speaker for the Cherokee Nation and became the chief spokesman for all negotiations with the Federal government. There were 3 cessions made of Cherokee lands in 1798 and it was common knowledge that Doublehead had prospered as a result. By 1804, he had become a prosperous land owner with about two dozen slaves. The Secretary of War, Dearborn, in fact, had given instructions that all agents were to deal specifically with Doublehead on the assumption he could be bribed. In 1805, Dearborn had Col. Return Jonathan Meigs acquire several valuable tracts of land with the promise that two tracts at the mouth of the Clinch and Hiwasee Rivers be exclusively for Doublehead's use. To add fuel to the fire, Doublehead had also leased several tracts at Muscle Choals to white farmers from a treaty he signed in Dec. 1806.
    By this time, a Cherokee faction led by James Vann, Major Ridge, and Alexander Saunders decided Doublehead should die for his crimes. Vann had a family score to settle. Doublehead had married a sister to Vann's wife and had treated her brutally, beating her to death while she was pregnant.
    Therefore, the three men decided to execute the traitor in Aug. 1807, when the Cherokees collected the annual annuity from the Federal agent. However, on the way, Vann fell ill and could not continue.
    On Aug. 9, 1807, Ridge and Saunders arrived at McIntosh's Tavern on the Hiwassee and waited for an opportunity. Doublehead had been playing ball 3 miles away where he had killed a man called Bone-Polisher who had become abusive. Therefore, he didn't arrive until after dark, half drunk. Suddenly, Ridge blew out the candle in the Tavern and fired a shot at Doublehead which shattered his jaw. Having thought they killed him, they slipped out into the dark.
    However, they soon learned the tavernkeeper had moved the wounded Chief to his house and then again to the loft of a Mr. Black, who taught in Gideon Blackburn's school. By then, two men from Bone Polisher's clan had joined them and together they rushed the room where Doublehead lay. As they approached, the wounded chief sprang up, drew a dirk, and tried to draw a pistol but was caught up in the sheet around him. Both Ridge and Saunders leveled their guns at him but misfired. Doublehead then grappled with Ridge but Saunders drove his tomahawk into Doublehead's skull so hard that it took two hands and a foot to pry it loose. After the killing, most of the Cherokees felt it was justified and his relatives were not forced by clan responsibility to exact revenge. This led to the abolition of clan revenge at the Council of Broomstown on Sept. 11, 1808. However, James Vann was killed in 1809 possibly for his part in the execution."

    Notes of Cora Mae Martin Shirley "The Roots of Yesterday" state that Doublehead died Aug 9, 1807 at Hiwasse Station, Indian Nation, Which later became the state of Tennessee.

    Original Wayne Co. included "Prices Station" in "Prices Meadow" near Touristville, KY.-crossing on Cumberland river-Domain of Cherokee Indian Chief, CHUQALATAGUE, (Doublehead)
    "Ancestors of Nancy Faye Gregory" quotes follows:
    "Now, as for Chief Doublehead, I originally quoted the following from the "Jonathan Blevins" book which is partially inaccurate (concerning his death).
    Chief Chugqualatague, or Doublehead, was the last Cherokee Chief to exercise control over the upper Cumberland plateau and was a lieutenant of Dragging Canoe. He was born near the present town of Somerset, KY, and had two known children by his wife who was reported to be of French-Indian extraction. These children were Cornblossom and Tuckaho.
    I have found several good books on Cherokee history, some of which give a good account of the circumstances of Doublehead's death. They are "Cherokee Tragedy: The Ridge Family and the Decimation of a People", by Thurman Wilkins, 1986, Univ. of Oklahoma Press, "The Cherokees", by Grace Steele Woodward, 1963, Univ. of Oklahoma Press, and "Trail of Tears: The Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Indian Nation", by John Ehle, 1988, Anchor Books (Doubleday). The first books gives the most detailed account and quotes two primary sources in its bibliography as follows:
    1) The Deposition of Caleb Starr concerning the death of Doublehead, dated Aug. 11, 1838, in the National Archives, RG75, Office of Indian Affairs, Removal Records (Cherokee), First Board of Cherokee Commissioners files, Heirs of Doublehead for spoilations."

    Notes of Cora Mae Martin Shirley "The Roots of Yesterday" state that Doublehead died Aug 9, 1807 at Hiwasse Station, Indian Nation, Which later became the state of Tennessee.

    Original Wayne Co. included "Prices Station" in "Prices Meadow" near Touristville, KY.-crossing on Cumberland river-Domain of Cherokee Indian Chief, CHUQALATAGUE, (Doublehead)
    "Ancestors of Nancy Faye Gregory" quotes follows:
    "Now, as for Chief Doublehead, I originally quoted the following from the "Jonathan Blevins" book which is partially inaccurate (concerning his death).
    Chief Chugqualatague, or Doublehead, was the last Cherokee Chief to exercise control over the upper Cumberland plateau and was a lieutenant of Dragging Canoe. He was born near the present town of Somerset, KY, and had two known children by his wife who was reported to be of French-Indian extraction. These children were Cornblossom and Tuckaho.
    I have found several good books on Cherokee history, some of which give a good account of the circumstances of Doublehead's death. They are "Cherokee Tragedy: The Ridge Family and the Decimation of a People", by Thurman Wilkins, 1986, Univ. of Oklahoma Press, "The Cherokees", by Grace Steele Woodward, 1963, Univ. of Oklahoma Press, and "Trail of Tears: The Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Indian Nation", by John Ehle, 1988, Anchor Books (Doubleday). The first books gives the most detailed account and quotes two primary sources in its bibliography as follows:
    1) The Deposition of Caleb Starr concerning the death of Doublehead, dated Aug. 11, 1838, in the National Archives, RG75, Office of Indian Affairs, Removal Records (Cherokee), First Board of Cherokee Commissioners files, Heirs of Doublehead for spoilations."

    2) "Col. Phillips' testimony relating to the death of Doublehead...Highwasee, Aug. 15, 1807", in National Archives, RG75, Records of the Cherokee Agency in Tennessee, M-208, Roll 3.....I will try to summarize as best I can.

    Chief Doublehead was a brother of Chief Old Tassel, as well as Pumpkin Boy. After the signing of the Treaty of Hopewell in 1785, delegates from Congress were trying to keep the peace between the Cherokees and squatters on their lands. In June 1788, Old Tassel was killed by a renegade settler by the name of Kirk while under a flag of truce and war became unavoidable. Old Tassel's death united the Cherokees under Little Turkey, including the Chickamaugas under Dragging Canoe, who split from the other Cherokee tribes some time earlier. In May 1792, John Watts succeeded Dragging Canoe as War Chief with Doublehead as his second in command. In Sep 1893, Watts and Doublehead led a campaign against the white settlers.
    A great atrocity was perpetrated on this campaign. Doublehead, his brother Pumpkin Boy, and their nephew Bench (Bob Benge) ambushed Capt. Overall, a known Indian fighter, and a companion named Burnett near Dripping Spring in KY. After they killed and scalped the two men, the Indians drank their whiskey, cut strips off the dead men, then roasted and devoured their flesh. At some time, Pumpkin Boy was killed on this campaign. John Sevier launched a campaign against the Cherokee towns and after a battle at Etowah, forced the Cherokees to sue for peace. Although another Treaty was signed in 1794, Brigadier General James Robertson had to tell Major James Ore to lead another campaign against the Chickamaugas before peace was restored.
    In 1796, Chief Doublehead had become the Speaker for the Cherokee Nation and became the chief spokesman for all negotiations with the Federal government. There were 3 cessions made of Cherokee lands in 1798 and it was common knowledge that Doublehead had prospered as a result. By 1804, he had become a prosperous land owner with about two dozen slaves. The Secretary of War, Dearborn, in fact, had given instructions that all agents were to deal specifically with Doublehead on the assumption he could be bribed. In 1805, Dearborn had Col. Return Jonathan Meigs acquire several valuable tracts of land with the promise that two tracts at the mouth of the Clinch and Hiwasee Rivers be exclusively for Doublehead's use. To add fuel to the fire, Doublehead had also leased several tracts at Muscle Choals to white farmers from a treaty he signed in Dec. 1806.
    By this time, a Cherokee faction led by James Vann, Major Ridge, and Alexander Saunders decided Doublehead should die for his crimes. Vann had a family score to settle. Doublehead had married a sister to Vann's wife and had treated her brutally, beating her to death while she was pregnant.
    Therefore, the three men decided to execute the traitor in Aug. 1807, when the Cherokees collected the annual annuity from the Federal agent. However, on the way, Vann fell ill and could not continue.
    On Aug. 9, 1807, Ridge and Saunders arrived at McIntosh's Tavern on the Hiwassee and waited for an opportunity. Doublehead had been playing ball 3 miles away where he had killed a man called Bone-Polisher who had become abusive. Therefore, he didn't arrive until after dark, half drunk. Suddenly, Ridge blew out the candle in the Tavern and fired a shot at Doublehead which shattered his jaw. Having thought they killed him, they slipped out into the dark.
    However, they soon learned the tavernkeeper had moved the wounded Chief to his house and then again to the loft of a Mr. Black, who taught in Gideon Blackburn's school. By then, two men from Bone Polisher's clan had joined them and together they rushed the room where Doublehead lay. As they approached, the wounded chief sprang up, drew a dirk, and tried to draw a pistol but was caught up in the sheet around him. Both Ridge and Saunders leveled their guns at him but misfired. Doublehead then grappled with Ridge but Saunders drove his tomahawk into Doublehead's skull so hard that it took two hands and a foot to pry it loose. After the killing, most of the Cherokees felt it was justified and his relatives were not forced by clan responsibility to exact revenge. This led to the abolition of clan revenge at the Council of Broomstown on Sept. 11, 1808. However, James Vann was killed in 1809 possibly for his part in the execution."

    Ref; Benge, Robert, Cronology of, has birth Loc; Stearns , Kentucky.
    Ref; Cherokee Tragedy
    Ref; E. Starr, 363, 416, By; Emmet Starr
    Ref: Alt. Spellings, "Tal-tsu'ska"- Two-heads,- fro ts'li, & Tsu'ska.
    Ref; Cherokee Chief about the year 1800, known to the Whites as Doublehead. Indian names also known as "Dsu-gwe-la-de-gi" and as "Chuqualatague".
    Ref; Full Blood Cherokee, Clan: Paint (Wurteh)
    Ref; 1842 Cherokee Claims; Skin Bayou District, Claim of Katy Spencer ne Pumpkin: Katy states that she lived with her uncle after her father's death, and that he died, abt. 1816. "It is quite possible that the Unknown Uncle that Katy mentions here is actually Doublehead and that she got his death date incorrect."

    Notes for DOUBLEHEAD:
    The Secretary of War for the United States Government had issued orders to deal only with Doublehead
    between 1798 and 1805 on the assumption that he could always be bought. Some of the land scessions
    he made were a major portion of Tennessee, stretching from the Hiwassee River to Muscle Shoals, it
    contained the best hunting grounds in the Cherokee domain, including Cumberland Plateau and parts
    of Kentucky.
    He was executed by The Ridge, and Alexander Saunders as a traitor and lawless speculator in
    Cherokee lands, other reasons were that he was a ruthless murderer, having beaten his pregnant wife
    until she miscarried, then continued to beat her until she died. He also killed a man called Bone-Polisher
    at the Cherokee ball play earlier in the day, of the same day he was executed.
 
Sources  1. [S553]   http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2717553&id=I12268
 
Home  Search  Individual  Pedigree  Descendancy  Relationship  Timeline  Login


Click here to get your own free online family tree
Powered by FamilyTreeGuide.com